Bingham’s 1819 Vote for Statehood

Two hundred years ago, in July 1819, Constable Benjamin Goodrich received a directive from the selectmen of Bingham ordering him to notify the town's qualified voters of a meeting to vote on the separation of Maine from Massachusetts. The text of their notice follows: To Benjamin Goodridge Constable of the Town of Bingham, Greetings: You … Continue reading Bingham’s 1819 Vote for Statehood

The Wood / Houghton / Doe Farm – An Old Landmark Gone

Last week the landscape on the south end of Bingham village changed with the demolition of the old Doe Farm. It was a building with a long history, on land first occupied by Ephraim Wood and his descendants, and soon the town will enjoy the convenience of a new gasoline station at this location. This … Continue reading The Wood / Houghton / Doe Farm – An Old Landmark Gone

Gov. William King’s Claim to Bingham’s Big Island

In the winter and spring of 1825, there was a quiet tussle over the ownership of the big island in the Kennebec River, located between Bingham and Concord.¬† Col. John Black, agent for the Trustees of the Estate of William Bingham, traveled there to try to close a sale with three settlers who had been … Continue reading Gov. William King’s Claim to Bingham’s Big Island

John and Solomon Berry – Early Settlers at Flagstaff, Maine

At the time of William Bingham's Kennebec Purchase, the Million Acres included¬† Township No. 4 in the 4th Range West of the Kennebec River - Flagstaff, now in Franklin County. Bingham's Estate records contain valuable information about early settlers in each of their townships. Of relevance here are John and Solomon Berry, among the first … Continue reading John and Solomon Berry – Early Settlers at Flagstaff, Maine